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Among the very ancient people of Sardinia, who were called Sardi or Sardoni, it was customary to kill old people. While killing their old people, the Sardi laughed loudly. This is the origin of notorious sardonic laughter (Eugen Fehrle, 1930), now meaning cruel, malicious laughter. In light of our findings things begin to look different. Laughter accompanies the passage from death to life; it creates life and accompanies birth. Consequently, laughter accompanying killing transforms death into a new birth, nullifies murder as such, and is an act of piety that transforms death into a new life. - Vladimir Propp, web text copy | paste.

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Detail, Shooting Laughter through a Transparent Film, apaper, oil paint, plastic, 2011 – 12

Decoration: adornment and waste
Decoration is a vast and wasteful allotment of resources and energy. Most people indulge in it. Most people use art as décor with remote trends in mind. Most people don’t care about what’s innovative in art and ecological design now. This is why so many people buy warm colorful large abstract panels to offset inefficient cold glass walls that need a highlight. Not many people want informal cold crumples of standard paper that signify the cruel exploitation of art and natural resources. Do cattle want a Sardinian S?

It’s hilarious that close to one century after the emergence of radically left abstraction in the plastic arts, it’s now a default setting for commercial urban décor. Perhaps in another century, abstraction will be the paradigm for presidential publicity. As a politician broadcasts the new world order with a Suprematist knockoff in the background, hoards of urbanites ask artists to crumple paper. In claustrophobically clean urban flats people cover small floor areas with every imaginable variation of the crumple.

Decoration: adornment and waste

Decoration is a vast and wasteful allotment of resources and energy. Most people indulge in it. Most people use art as décor with remote trends in mind. Most people don’t care about what’s innovative in art and ecological design now. This is why so many people buy warm colorful large abstract panels to offset inefficient cold glass walls that need a highlight. Not many people want informal cold crumples of standard paper that signify the cruel exploitation of art and natural resources. Do cattle want a Sardinian S?

It’s hilarious that close to one century after the emergence of radically left abstraction in the plastic arts, it’s now a default setting for commercial urban décor. Perhaps in another century, abstraction will be the paradigm for presidential publicity. As a politician broadcasts the new world order with a Suprematist knockoff in the background, hoards of urbanites ask artists to crumple paper. In claustrophobically clean urban flats people cover small floor areas with every imaginable variation of the crumple.

We prepare for this time in the present by using informal methods of display, crumpling things, and hand making large colorful surfaces. Collectors may choose to casually frame, hang, crumple, and drop the surfaces anywhere. Gallery showrooms encourage people to drop them on flat surfaces like a rug or table cloth. People may put plates, lamps, feet, tea cups, or whatever on the surfaces.

For now, they probably won’t because each surface is original. Therefore, we move toward the production of custom mass produced surfaces to give people more confidence in destroying the unoriginality of these decorations. Mass production allows us to reach a larger contingency. In this economy, more is more.

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